Raindrops Keep Falling on my Radar - Part 2

Last time we looked at the raindrop fall speed of raindrops during a thunderstorm and compared the radar reflected power to my observations of the storm moving through State College. Today, thanks to Yvette Richardson and Bill Syrett from the Penn State Meteorology Department, we can compare the radar returns to actual weather station data. They were able to provide data from a weather station on top of the meteorology building on campus, about 3 miles from where my radar was located.

We expect more power to be returned to the radar during periods of heavy rain, so the main variable of interest is the rain rate. We'll plot up a couple of other meteorological variables just for fun as well. The weather station recorded observations every minute. I had to venture my best guess at the units based on their values. The rain rate values are low. Another station that I don't have the time-series for reported a maximum rain rate of 0.26 in/hr. Either way, let's examine the relative changes.

rain_wx_data_graph

 

Looking at the plot we can see that our prediction of higher rain rate equaling more reflected power holds. Unfortunately, the weather station didn't record precipitation rate with very fine resolution, so we really can only match the peak rain rate with the peak reflected power. The vertical red line marks the time of a weather service doppler radar screenshot we looked at in the last post that was right before the heaviest rain arrived. We also observe the higher wind speeds with the gust front ahead of the storm. As the storm passed over we saw decreasing pressures as well. The temperature and humidity aren't shown because they really weren't that interesting.

Now that we've verified our hypothesis (roughly anyway) about precipitation rate and radar return, we are ready to look at different types of reflectors. Next time, we will look at radar data collected during a snow storm for return intensity and the fall speed of snow flakes. That speed can be compared with video of falling snow for verification. Stay tuned!

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